Prosecutor in charge of investigation into ‘Rust’ says he knows who loaded the gun

The prosecutor in charge of the investigation into the fatal shooting of Halyna Hutchins on the ‘Rust’ film set has said he knows who loaded the gun.

Mary Carmack-Altwies told Good Morning America that there were “so many levels of failure” on set before Hutchins was accidentally shot and killed by actor Alec Baldwin, 63, on Oct. 21.

Authorities have been investigating how a suspected live round got into the firearm, which had been declared safe by a deputy director. And when asked if she knew who had loaded the fatal shot, Carmack-Altwies looked into the camera and said “yes.”

After the shooting, which also injured Rust director Joel Souza, the Santa Fe sheriff said there had been “some complacency” in the way weapons were handled.

The gun was supplied by the gunsmith, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, and checked by the assistant director David Halls, who told Baldwin it was a “cold gun,” meaning it had blanks when he put it on Hutchins, 42, aimed and fired during practice. a scene.

Mary Carmack-Altwies, (left) the prosecutor in charge of the investigation, told Good Morning America there were

Mary Carmack-Altwies, (left) the prosecutor in charge of the investigation, told Good Morning America there were “so many levels of failure” on set before Hutchins’ death

Hutchins, a mother of one, was 42 when she was murdered on October 21

Actor Alec Baldwin, 63, accidentally shot and killed cameraman Halyna Hutchins when a gun he was holding went off while filming for the western movie Rust in New Mexico last month

Alec Baldwin was spotted Sunday night in New York with wife Hilaria - weeks after the couple escaped to Vermont with their six children

Alec Baldwin was spotted Sunday night in New York with wife Hilaria – weeks after the couple escaped to Vermont with their six children

Authorities searched the film's set as they investigate how a live round ended up in the firearm

Authorities searched the film’s set as they investigate how a live round ended up in the firearm

The set has been shut down since that fateful day on October 21, while authorities investigate the scene. Baldwin himself has said the low-budget film is unlikely to ever be completed.

Last week, Baldwin, who also worked as a producer for the film, shared a message from a Rust crew member dismissing concerns about safety on the set of the film.

In the weeks after the shooting, several former crew members spoke out about the unsafe environment on set.

Lane Luper, who was the film’s A-camera first assistant, said he quit a day before the fatal shooting because workers were overworked, COVID safety was not properly enforced and gun safety was poor.

“I think with Rust it was the perfect storm of the gunsmith, the assistant director, the culture that was on set, the rushing. It was all,” he told Good Morning America of the events leading up to the deadly shooting.

“It wasn’t just one person. Everything had to fall into place for this one-in-a-trillion thing to happen.”

He went on to dispute the producers’ claim that safety was a top priority on set, saying, “I personally only remember two safety meetings involving the entire crew.”

The pistol Baldwin used to shoot Hutchins, supplied by the gun master, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed (pictured)

The pistol Baldwin used to shoot Hutchins, supplied by the gun master, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed (pictured)

The set of the film has been shut down since the deadly shooting

The set of the film has been shut down since the deadly shooting

Luper eventually accused the film’s production of violating the cardinal rule of having guns on set, which he said was, “There will be no live rounds anywhere on a studio site, or on a stage, or on a set.”

He also choked when he described the late Halyna Hutchins, saying, “She was something really special.”

In his letter of resignation, Luper said there were two accidental gunfires on set and one accidental explosion with sound effects around the crew.

“No explanation has been given as to what to expect from these recordings. When someone from production is asked, we usually get the same answers about not having enough time to finish the day when we rehearse or that “this is a 21-day shoot,” Luper wrote in the letter.

He added that the crew was exhausted from the long commute from the set to their whereabouts, which was more than two hours away.

“In my 10 years as a camera assistant, I’ve never worked on a show that cares so little about crew safety,” said Luper.

“What the hell just happened?” Baldwin reportedly asked cast and crew members after the shot went off, and Hutchins suddenly stumbled back into the arms of lead electrician Serge Svetnoy

Sources tell the Los Angeles Times they never saw Kenney on the New Mexico movie set

Sources tell the Los Angeles Times they never saw Kenney on the New Mexico movie set

Luper also told Sky News that he decided to speak out because he wanted to make it clear that he believes Hutchins’ death was caused by cost cutting and budget cuts.

“Halyna’s death could have been prevented simply by following industry safety rules that were in effect for literally decades,” he said, adding: “I’ve never felt so unsafe on set or off.

“I’ve never felt more in danger of death on set or on the way home, I was so exhausted.”

He said the production team put potential profit above the safety and wellbeing of the crew, noting: “The crew themselves have worked very hard, but I don’t think they were necessarily respected by the producers.

“This set was unsafe simply because they didn’t have the resources to follow the safety rules we have in this industry.”

Luper added that there were “no rehearsals, there were no safety meetings to explain what the next shot was, which is also a requirement every time you use firearms.”

In a statement to Sky News, a spokesperson for the producers responded to his claims, saying: “Mr. Luper’s claims about budget and security are patently false, which isn’t surprising given that his job was a cameraman and he had absolutely nothing to do with it or have any knowledge of security protocols or budgets.

“Because we continue to cooperate with all investigations, we are limited in what we can say,” the spokesperson continues. However, safety is always the number one priority

Baldwin has criticized critics who claimed working conditions on set were unsafe

Baldwin has criticized critics who claimed working conditions on set were unsafe

Last week, however, Baldwin fired back at claims that working conditions on set were unsafe, by sharing a social media post by a crew member reprimanding her colleagues for presenting a “blatantly inaccurate” portrayal of the set as “chaotic and unsafe.” painted. .

Baldwin shared a screenshot of costume designer Terese Magpale Davis’ post on his Instagram account with the caption, “Read this.”

“I’m so sick of this story,” Davis wrote in her post. “I’ve been working on this movie. The story being spun that we are overworked and surrounded by unsafe, chaotic conditions is downright ridiculous.”

Davis’ post refuted many of the crew members’ complaints, including that they routinely worked more than 12-hour days.

‘We never worked longer than a 12.5-hour recording day. That was once,” Davis wrote.

“Most days were under 12. On the day Halyna died, we had a 12-hour turnaround from an 11-hour shooting day. We got out (including camera) at 6.30 pm.’

Davis went on to say that the deadly on-set shooting will haunt her for a long time to come. She notes that she is angry with Dave Hall, the assistant director who handed Baldwin the gun, but wouldn’t accuse him of not caring about safety.

“I am heartbroken and furious,” she wrote. “I can never get the sound of that shot or my director’s screams out of my head because of that.”

‘My friend is dead. Am I mad at him? Yes. But I won’t jump on the bandwagon and pretend he didn’t care about our safety all the way.”

Baldwin had been silent about the incident on Rust before sharing the post.

The full interview will air on Good Morning America on November 10 at 7:00 AM UTC.

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